Paracord Coaster - Yetter Mat

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Introduction: Paracord Coaster - Yetter Mat

I will show how to make a paracord coaster with a knot that I created. I have not found this knot pattern anywhere, so I don't know if it has a name. I will call it the Yetter Mat until I can find a better name.

Update: A friend, Ilze Vainovska, found a reference to this knot in a Russian book by Майя Локшина (St.Petersburg, 2015) as the Prophecy knot. Google translated the name as the Divination Knot. The text seems to indicate that this knot is useful when seeking guidance about making changes in your life and the knot should be tied new for each change event in your life. There also seems to be a connection to the Roman Goddess Juno Moneta.

It appears that the knot can be sewn onto tarot card pouches, maybe to increase the accuracy of the card reading.

Update 2: Donald Allen a.k.a The Rope Doctor came up with this design in 2007 as well. He was making floor mats and has hundreds of patterns. This one is described as a 19" diameter.

Supplies

6 - 7 ft of 550 paracord, longer if you plan to triple it.

lacing needle, optional

scissors or knife

lighter

Step 1: Knot Pattern

This is the full pattern.

Update: My friend Ilze Vainovska made an easy to follow image to use as well using the red cord.

Step 2: Make a Loop

Starting from the middle of the cord, make a clockwise loop going over the standing end.

Step 3: Add Another Loop

Cross the working end over the first loop, going over, over O-O

Step 4: Add Another Loop

Cross the first two loops going under, over, under U-O-U

Step 5: Cross the Previous Loop

Cross the previous loop going over, over O-O.

Step 6: Add Another Loop

Add a loop through the middle of the knot, locking in the cord from the last step. This loop goes over, under, under, over, under O-U-U-O-U.

Step 7: Cross the Loop and Standing End

Cross over the last loop and under the standing end. O-O-U

Step 8: Finish the Knot

To finish the knot, follow the path of the pink cord through the center of the knot, alternating over and under. O-U-O-U-O-U-O-U

Step 9: Clean Up the Knot

Take your time and clean up the knot at this time. It will save you time later. Check the small square in the center for squareness. Check the 4 pretzel knots to make sure they are the same size and shape. You should be able to see a large square formed around the knot, just inside of the eight bights.

Step 10: Double the Knot (optional)

Switch the lacing needle to the standing end, which will now become the working end. Feed the needle to the outside of the cord where it exited the knot in Step 8. Carefully follow the cord backwards through the know until you have doubled the first knot. If you run out of cord, as I did, then work the gaps and slack out of the knot until it is properly doubled. Take your time working the knot into the shape and size that you want. When you are done, cut the ends and melt them with the lighter. I usually hide the ends behind the same crossing for a cleaner look.

1 Person Made This Project!

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23 Comments

2
skylane
skylane

1 year ago on Step 10

I have a few old beaded usb cables that are 6 & 10 feet long that can become useful again!

0
xstfoc
xstfoc

Reply 1 year ago

Do you think the sheathing on your cables will melt if you intend to put hot pans or dishes on it?

0
skylane
skylane

Reply 1 year ago

I had not considered using it for hot pans. I was thinking of using it for my coffee cup.
It would be easy enough to test by touching the cord to a hot pan and see what happens a hot pan prior to knotting it.
I don't know exactly what the woven sheathing is made of.

0
xstfoc
xstfoc

Reply 1 year ago

I suppose the best cording foe a hotpad or trivet would be either sisal rope or plain old cotton clothesline. I love the Celtic Knot.

0
ScottHall
ScottHall

Reply 1 year ago

I use my for coffee cups all of the time. Everyday. That is my primary use case.

0
ScottHall
ScottHall

Reply 1 year ago

That's a good idea. I have a few of those laying around.

2
bernyemm
bernyemm

1 year ago

Inspired by your article, I made this design using Inkscape. Thanks.

Knott.png
0
ScottHall
ScottHall

Reply 1 year ago

That is so cool. Thanks for sharing.

0
xstfoc
xstfoc

1 year ago

Has anyone made this and used it for a hotpad or trivet? Did it melt at all, seeing how it was done with nylon-covered paracord? Let us all know how well this project holds up to hot pans and dishes on it.

0
ScottHall
ScottHall

Reply 1 year ago

I would be hesitant to try paracord as a hot pad, since it melts with a lighter. There are better cord choices for that.

0
ScottHall
ScottHall

Reply 1 year ago

Paracord melts at 244°C ( 470°F )

0
ScottHall
ScottHall

Reply 1 year ago

I agree. The ABoK is not the easiest book to start with, but it is full of useful knowledge.

1
arghc
arghc

1 year ago

It is the overlapping variant of the square kringle mat.

0
ScottHall
ScottHall

Reply 1 year ago

That is exactly right. I had tied the 4 knot Kringle mat and wanted to cross the center cords, and this was the result.

Kringle mat 4 knot.pngYetter Mat 4 knots.png
1
jeanniel1
jeanniel1

1 year ago

How cool is this? The paracord you used is such a good color and thickness.

0
ScottHall
ScottHall

Reply 1 year ago

Thanks for the kind words. I'm glad you like it.

1
MartyK1
MartyK1

1 year ago

Looks like an 8-sided variant of a thump mat, of which most are 5 or 6-sided. Nice instructable!

0
ScottHall
ScottHall

Reply 1 year ago

Thanks for the kind words. I was trying to extend the standard thump mats when I came up with this pattern.